Why did we get the GDPR? Find out in my book The Closing of the Net - PAPERBACK OR KINDLE - £15.99!

Brexit

Brexit - Britain's Exit from the European Union

Do you say 'Breggsit' or 'Brecksit'? Some people roll the 'e' around the mouth, making it sound like warm and fluffy scrambled eggs. Others sound it out hard like a brick wall.

As Britain prepares to exit from the European Union will we find ourselves in two years' time stuck to the bottom of the pan and will Britain be toast? Or will we be smiling, and say byebye to EU regulations whilst   sitting down to a great British breakfast of British bacon, British eggs, British tomatoes, British marmalade and the quintessential British cup of tea?

The bacon may come from a British pig, but its feed could be subject to new tariffs, and vetinary products that keep it healthy will fall out of EU regulatory regimes. Likewise the tomatoes and the marmalade. These changes will have implications for the price we pay and for food safety. Similarly, there will be implications for other industries, as Britain's business lobby, the CBI has said

Brexit is not just about walking out of the house and slamming the door. It is about fundamental changes to the way our country operates. The EU is an integral part of an international system and breaking away means that a massive web of international business that supports our most basic needs like food, will rip in places we did not even know existed.

So how might Britain fare under Brexit? This blog will explore the Brexit process and the policy challenges it raises.

 

If you are interested in Brexit research or training programmes, please contact me via the Contact page on this website

If you are following the Brexit discussions around telecoms and technology policy,  you may like my book The Closing of the Net.

As we saw in part 1, the ways that Brexit rips through business models are quite complex. Travelling back in time to a simpler era in 1973 before the UK joined the EEC, does not seem like a practical option for business. Cross-border trade, which was the exception back then, is now the norm. People get on planes for one-day conferences and business meetings. The simple email that was conceived inthe early 1970s  has itself been outgunned by the smartphone app. Rules are needed to govern these new practices that in themselves generate unforeseen legal complexities.  Being outside the EU will not suddenly drop the UK back into a simple system where it can pull up drawbridge and act as an island. There will be too many wires left dangling.

In part 1 of How Brexit Rips Up Business Models,  we considered the effects of a post-Brexit dual compliance regime. Here, in Part 2,  we look at some specific aspects  of  Brexit-imposed  changes to cross-border trade and trade in services.  

Read more: How Brexit rips up business models Part 2: visas for money and music

Brexit negotiations - Dominic Raab and Michel Barnier - 2018 - and CE mark robot

We cannot just draw a line around these islands and go back to a time past. In 1973 when Britain voted to join what was then the EEC,  the email had only just been invented and the Internet wasn’t even conceived. In 1992,  the Single Market was established and the Internet went commercial. From the mid-1990s, low-cost flights came in and little bags of salad leaves became the norm in our supermarkets. Since then, business has changed to an inter-connected model,  underpinned  by electronic communications and laws designed to support cross-border trade. Standards matter, not just within State borders, but across borders. The rupture from the Single Market created by Brexit in any form  will have massive consequences for industries,  both manufacturing and services, that have based their business model on the EU legal framework.

This article – part 1 of 2 – explores the how  withdrawing from the EU Single Market will result in  a dual-compliance regime.  It draws on EU Preparedness Notifications and UK government ‘no deal’ notices, as well as announcements, media reports and statements from a range of British-based businesses.

Read more: How Brexit rips up business models Part 1: putting back barriers

Giant parrot by tower bridge

How does an obscure article in the Lisbon Treaty obfuscate Britain's efforts to formulate a post-Brexit relationship with the European Union? And what does this have to do with dead parrots? 

It was Margaret Thatcher who famously replayed Monty Python’s  ‘dead parrot’ sketch at the Tory party conference 28 years ago in 1990. This week, as the Conservative Party gathered in Birmingham for its annual get-together,  it would seem a dead parrot is once again at the centre of the debate.

Read more: Norwegian Blue or Super-Canada - is there any life in this parrot?

dr.monica.horten.at.eclipse.foundation.london.24.nov.2016.crop.jpg

 

States v the 'Net? 

Read The Closing of the Net, by me, Monica Horten.

"original and valuable"  Times higher Education

" essential read for anyone interested in understanding the forces at play behind the web." ITSecurity.co.uk

Find out more about the book here  The Closing of the Net

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Copyright Enforcement Enigma launch, March 2012

In 2012, I presented my PhD research in the European Parliament.

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Iptegrity.com is the website of Dr Monica Horten. She is  a trainer & consultant on Internet governance policy, published author& Visiting Fellow at the London School of Economics & Political Science. She served as an independent expert on the Council of Europe Committee on  Internet freedom. She has worked on CoE, EU and UNDP funded projects in eastern Europe and beyond.  She was shortlisted for The Guardian Open Internet Poll 2012. Iptegrity  offers expert insights into Internet policy (and now Brexit). Iptegrity has a core readership in the Brussels policy community, and has been cited in the media. Please acknowledge Iptegrity when you cite or link.  For more, see IP politics with integrity

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