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Member States

Now that there is a European Copyright Directive (2017) this section may look out of date. At the time when most of these articles were written - 2008-2012 - matters were more fluid. Several Member States were look at how they could implement laws to address the problem of the day, which was peer-to-peer file sharing. For those who are studying this area of policy, it's an important part of the context for the 2017 law, and indeed for subsequent developments that may not deal with copyright, but do seek to enforce against content using similar measures.

This section of Iptegrity.com discusses Internet policy initiatives in the EU Member States, between 2008-2012, with the exception of France and Britain which are discussed in individual sections of the site.

If you like the articles in this section and you are interested in how policy for Internet, copyright, and net neutrality is made in the EU Member States, you may like my books A Copyright Masquerade: How Corporate Lobbying Threatens Online Freedoms and The Copyright Enforcement Enigma - Internet Politics and the 'Telecoms Package'

If you are interested in EU policy on Internet governance, you may like my book The Closing of the Net .

Hungarian Media Law - commission amendments - web-based media are still required to register, under threat of a fine for non-compliance.

The European Commission struck an eleventh hour deal with Hungary whilst the Commissioner herself was in the air between Milan and Brussels, and only minutes before a vote in the European Parliament criticising the Hungarian government's media law. Commissioner Neelie Kroes, still a little breathless it seems, after rushing from the airport, told the Parliament that she would not shy away from defending media pluralism.

Nevertheless, it seems the Commission's strong stance has weakened since Mrs Kroes first wrote to the Hungarian government in December. And after Mrs Kroes' dash from the airport, the European Parliament failed to vote on its Resolutions - apparently after some confusion as to what it should do.

The agreement was produced last Wednesday and seems to

Read more: European Commission shows a weak hand to Hungary

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A letter written by European Commissioner for Information Society, Neelie Kroes, has seriously criticised the Hungarian Media Law on the basis that it could be incompatible with EU law. The Commission indicates that the law is disproportionate and that it may create a restriction on free speech.

Neelie Kroes letter is addressed to the Deputy Prime Minister of Hungary, Tibor Navracsics. It is dated 21 January 2011, and leaked via a Hungarian website yesterday.

The letter is critical of the Hungarian Media Law on three counts: the obligation for

Read more: Leaked Commission letter blasts Hungarian Media Law

Confirmation that the Hungarian Internet is at risk comes has been submitted to the European Parliament, by a security organisation which monitors for breaches of free speech in the new East European democracies.

Condemnation of the Hungarian Media Law continued last week with a letter to the European Parliament. The European Parliament's Civil Liberties (LIBE) Committee has been told of a number of serious concerns with the Law. The concerns were raised by the Organisation for Security and Co-operation in Europe (OSCE) - an international organisation which monitors security and other issues in the former Eastern bloc - which wrote to the Libe committee last week.

In a letter seen by iptegrity.com, Dunja Mijatovic, the OSCE's Representative on Freedom of the Media is sharply critical of the Hungarian Media Law,

Read more: MEPs briefed on web sanctions in Hungarian Media Law

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About Iptegrity

Iptegrity.com is the website of Dr Monica Horten. I am an  independent policy advisor: online safety, technology and human rights. In April 2024, I was appointed as an independent expert on the Council of Europe Committee of Experts on online safety and empowerment of content creators and users. I am a published author, and post-doctoral scholar. I hold a PhD from the University of Westminster, and a DipM from the Chartered Institute of Marketing. I cover the UK and EU. I'm a former tech journalist, and an experienced panelist and Chair. My media credits include the BBC, iNews, Times, Guardian and Politico.

Iptegrity.com is made available free of charge for non-commercial use. Please link back and attribute Dr Monica Horten.  Contact me to use any of my content for commercial purposes.  

The politics of copyright

A Copyright Masquerade - How corporate lobbying threatens online freedoms

'timely and provocative' Entertainment Law Review