Are you concerned about British copyright politics & how rights-holders win influence? Then read 

A Copyright Masquerade: how corporate lobbying threatens online freedoms

 'Tells a tale that needs to be heard'' Entertainment Law Review 'shows a great deal about how modern lobbying works' ZDNet

Available worldwide in paperback or download  Amazon Kindle: United States   -  UKGermany  - France   -  Italy - Spain

EPub: Waterstones EPub  -    Angus and Robertson E-book Instant Download (Australia)    

Member States

European Union Member States are all considering policy options for the Internet and for copyright enforcement online. This section of Iptegrity.com discusses Internet policy initiatives in the EU Member States, with the exception of France and the UK which are discussed in individual sections of the site.

If you like the articles in this section and you are interested in how policy for Internet, copyright, and net neutrality is made in the EU Member States, you may like my books A Copyright Masquerade: How Corporate Lobbying Threatens Online Freedoms and The Copyright Enforcement Enigma - Internet Politics and the ‘Telecoms Package’

Confidential leaked document reveal draconian plans by Germany's right-wing CDU party  for 3-strikes and criminal enforcement of copyright, plus a new right to protect newspapers online. 

Germany's Christian Democrat party, of which the Chancellor Angela Merkel is the leader,  has  set out plans to introduce graduated response / 3-strikes measures to support copyright in a pre-election manifesto that has appeared on  Wikileaks. The document also calls for strengthened international cooperation against copyright infringement, and for the German police to get more resources to

Read more: German 3-strikes plans uncovered

A leaked document suggests that Italy  is considering  French-style 3-strikes measures, but they could be more wide-ranging. It also appears that the Italian government is backtracking on a proposal to consult users and consumer organisations.

 

Last October, the Italian government announced its intention to form a committee to review options for dealing with Internet copyright infringements. At the time, the Minister of Culture, Sandro Bondi, indicated interest in persuing a French-style 3-strikes proposal, but said that all interests, including consumers and users, would be included in a consultation process. Since then, the situation appears to have changed. I have pieced this story together from various media reports and from  contacts in Italy.

 

It seems that in December, three members of the new committee  -  Comitato tecnico  contro la pirateria digitale e multimediale - were announced. One was from the SIAE, which is the Italian collecting society

Read more: 3-strikes +++ proposed in Italy

According to reports in the Italian media, Italy's prime minister, Silvio Berlusconi, has come up with a proposal to regulate the Internet. He wants to put it to a meeting of the G8 - the club of the world's leading economies -   which he will be chairing from January. The rationale appears to be that the G8 already oversees the financial markets, and the Internet has no regulation. Berlusconi  is also suggesting that Italy could take the lead.

However, it should not be overlooked that Berlusconi owns a large media empire, which is threatened by developments on the Internet. 

Read the reports here:

Corriere della Sera

Repubblica

Iptegrity resumes

I am resuming Iptegrity after a long break  - the first I had in  7 years of writing this blog. I extended my time out after I sprained my wrist in August, when  I had a little  brush with carpal tunnel syndrome. It has been worth the patience to let it heal, and I'd recommend to all my readers to look after your wrists, and do listen to ergonomic advice.

I am also working on a new book - updates on progress will appear here over the coming months.

Iptegrity.com is the website of Dr Monica Horten,  policy writer and Visiting Fellow at the London School of Economics & Political Science. She is an independent expert on the Council of Europe Committee on Cross-border flow of Internet traffic and Internet freedom (MSI-INT). She was shortlisted for The Guardian Open Internet Poll 2012. Iptegrity  offers expert insights into Internet policy. Iptegrity is read by lawyers, academics, policy-makers and citizens, and cited in the media. Please acknowledge Iptegrity when you cite or link.  For more, see IP politics with integrity

A top IP law book!

A Copyright Masquerade - How corporate lobbying threatens online freedoms

'timely and provocative' Entertainment Law Review

Paperback and Kindle and Epub formats.

Available at the following online stores or get it from the publisher Zed Books  direct:

Amazon France

Amazon Germany

Amazon Italy

Amazon UK

Amazon USA

Waterstones Online UK

The Guardian Bookshop

Librerias Marcial Pons Spain 

Librarie Europeene / The European Bookshop, Brussels

Orell Füssli, Zurich, Switzerland

Iptegrity.com is made available free of charge for  non-commercial use, Please link-back & attribute Monica Horten. Thank you for respecting this.

Contact  me to use  iptegrity content for commercial purposes