Big tech accountability? Read how we got here in  The Closing of the Net 

Member States

Now that there is a European Copyright Directive  (2017) this section may look out of date. At the time when most of these articles were written - 2008-2012 - matters were more fluid. Several Member States were look at how they could implement laws to address the problem of the day, which was peer-to-peer file sharing.  For those who are studying this area of policy, it's an important part of the context for the 2017 law, and indeed for subsequent developments that may not deal with copyright, but do seek to enforce against content using similar measures.

This section of Iptegrity.com discusses Internet policy initiatives in the EU Member States, between 2008-2012, with the exception of France and Britain which are discussed in individual sections of the site.

If you like the articles in this section and you are interested in how policy for Internet, copyright, and net neutrality is made in the EU Member States, you may like my books A Copyright Masquerade: How Corporate Lobbying Threatens Online Freedoms and The Copyright Enforcement Enigma - Internet Politics and the ‘Telecoms Package’

If you are interested in EU policy on Internet governance,   you may like my book The Closing of the Net .

Germany's culture minister has become enamoured of the copyright industries and is calling for copyright enforcement measures that look remarkably like a kind of ‘3-strikes and you're fined'.   But will he find himself in conflict with his Ministerial colleagues?

 

Bernd Neumann, Germany's Culture Minister last week called for a form of graduated response copyright enforcement measures. Speaking at  a Christian Democrat Media Night, to an audience of  copyright industry lobbyists, Herr Neumann said that German copyright law should be extended to incorporate what he called a Warnhinweismodell  (‘warnings and notification model). He also called for the ISPs to be made liable for copyright enforcement.

 

Herr Neumann's speech was typical of what we are now seeing policy-makers do in this area. They daren't come out publicly with what they are really planning, for fear of a PR backlash, so they couch it in words which are vague.  The model he described in his speech  suggests that

Read more: Rücksprung durch Technik - will Germany shift to 3-strikes?

Hungarian Media Law - commission amendments -  web-based media are still required to register, under threat of a fine for non-compliance.  

 The European Commission  struck an eleventh hour deal with Hungary whilst the Commissioner herself was in the air between Milan and Brussels, and only  minutes  before a vote in the European Parliament criticising the Hungarian government's media law.  Commissioner Neelie Kroes, still a little breathless it seems, after rushing from the airport, told the Parliament that she would not shy away from defending media pluralism.

 Nevertheless, it seems the Commission's strong stance has weakened since Mrs Kroes first wrote to the Hungarian government in December. And after Mrs Kroes' dash from the airport, the European Parliament failed to vote on its  Resolutions  - apparently after some confusion  as to what it should do.

The agreement  was produced last Wednesday and  seems to

Read more: European Commission shows a weak hand to Hungary

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A letter written by European Commissioner for Information Society, Neelie Kroes, has seriously criticised the Hungarian Media Law on the basis that it could be incompatible with EU law. The Commission indicates that the law is disproportionate  and that it may create  a restriction on free speech.

 

Neelie Kroes  letter is addressed to the Deputy Prime Minister of Hungary, Tibor Navracsics. It is dated 21 January 2011, and leaked via a Hungarian website yesterday.

 

The letter is critical of  the Hungarian Media Law on three counts: the obligation for

Read more: Leaked Commission letter blasts Hungarian Media Law

dr.monica.horten.moldova.ict.summit.april2016.crop.jpg

 

States v the 'Net? 

Read The Closing of the Net, by me, Monica Horten.

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" essential read for anyone interested in understanding the forces at play behind the web." ITSecurity.co.uk

Find out more about the book here  The Closing of the Net

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Copyright Enforcement Enigma launch, March 2012

In 2012, I presented my PhD research in the European Parliament.

Iptegrity in brief

 

Iptegrity.com is the website of Dr Monica Horten. I’ve been analysing analysing digital policy since 2008. Way back then, I identified how issues around rights can influence Internet policy, and that has been a thread throughout all of my research. I hold a PhD in EU Communications Policy from the University of Westminster (2010), and a Post-graduate diploma in marketing. I am on the Advisory Council of the Open Rights Group.  I’ve served as an independent expert on the Council of Europe  Committee on Internet Freedoms, and was involved in a capacity building project in Moldova, Georgia, and Ukraine. For more, see About Iptegrity

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