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Member States

Now that there is a European Copyright Directive (2017) this section may look out of date. At the time when most of these articles were written - 2008-2012 - matters were more fluid. Several Member States were look at how they could implement laws to address the problem of the day, which was peer-to-peer file sharing. For those who are studying this area of policy, it's an important part of the context for the 2017 law, and indeed for subsequent developments that may not deal with copyright, but do seek to enforce against content using similar measures.

This section of Iptegrity.com discusses Internet policy initiatives in the EU Member States, between 2008-2012, with the exception of France and Britain which are discussed in individual sections of the site.

If you like the articles in this section and you are interested in how policy for Internet, copyright, and net neutrality is made in the EU Member States, you may like my books A Copyright Masquerade: How Corporate Lobbying Threatens Online Freedoms and The Copyright Enforcement Enigma - Internet Politics and the 'Telecoms Package'

If you are interested in EU policy on Internet governance, you may like my book The Closing of the Net .

A leaked document suggests that Italy is considering French-style 3-strikes measures, but they could be more wide-ranging. It also appears that the Italian government is backtracking on a proposal to consult users and consumer organisations.

Last October, the Italian government announced its intention to form a committee to review options for dealing with Internet copyright infringements. At the time, the Minister of Culture, Sandro Bondi, indicated interest in persuing a French-style 3-strikes proposal, but said that all interests, including consumers and users, would be included in a consultation process. Since then, the situation appears to have changed. I have pieced this story together from various media reports and from contacts in Italy.

It seems that in December, three members of the new committee - Comitato tecnico contro la pirateria digitale e multimediale - were announced. One was from the SIAE, which is the Italian collecting society

Read more: 3-strikes +++ proposed in Italy

According to reports in the Italian media, Italy's prime minister, Silvio Berlusconi, has come up with a proposal to regulate the Internet. He wants to put it to a meeting of the G8 - the club of the world's leading economies - which he will be chairing from January. The rationale appears to be that the G8 already oversees the financial markets, and the Internet has no regulation. Berlusconi is also suggesting that Italy could take the lead.

However, it should not be overlooked that Berlusconi owns a large media empire, which is threatened by developments on the Internet.

Read the reports here:

Corriere della Sera

Repubblica

Is corporate censorship by the music industry what we want for Europe?

Italian Internet Service Providers (ISPs) have been ordered by a judge to block access to the Swedish peer-to-peer file trading site The Pirate Bay. It's understood the order was given on 8th August by a judge in the city of Bergamo, in the north of Italy, and sent to all the large Italian ISPs. It is understood that they have since complied with it.

The Pirate Bay is understood to have put in place measures which permit users to get access in spite of the blocks.

However, what concerned me was a report in TorrentFreak that the blocked users were being redirected to a page hosted on an IFPI-owned server. I felt it unwise to report this without checking, and having carried out reverse IP and Whois checks on the IP address of the redirect page , I can confirm that this is the case. I have already commented on the changes to European law which have been voted through in the Telecoms Package, which reduce ISP liability for blocking content, contrary to existing European law. This judgement - with a redirect to IFPI - only serves to confirm my view that this is a change demanded by the music industry and the politicians are giving in to such pressure without taking the trouble to understand the wider implications. Censorship doesn't have to be done by the State. And ISPs are capable of putting up their own redirect pages. If P2P sites can be blocked to support copyright, and traffic redirected to the rights-holders, what comes next?


The story is covered by the International Herald Tribune, and by TorrentFreak .

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About Iptegrity

Iptegrity.com is the website of Dr Monica Horten. I am an  independent policy advisor, with expertise in online safety, technology and human rights. I am a published author, and post-doctoral scholar. I hold a PhD from the University of Westminster, and a DipM from the Chartered Institute of Marketing. I cover the UK and EU. I'm a former tech journalist, and an experienced panelist and Chair. My media credits include the BBC, iNews, Times, Guardian and Politico.

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