The Closing of the Net  "original and valuable"  Times Higher Education


The Closing of the Net 

 My latest book is now available in bookstores. It's published by Polity Press. Here I outline what the book is about.

What is meant by The Closing of the Net? Iptegrity readers will already have their own interpretation. The notion has been helpfully or otherwise referred to by  Donald Trump who called for "closing that Internet up in some way".  Trump was reflecting calls by various political interests, including the intelligence services, for the technology companies to 'do something'. Do something about what? He was calling for restrictions on content reflecting undesirable agendas such as extremism.  Closing the net entails 

Read more: The Closing of the Net

A Copyright Masquerade by Monica Horten cover Entertainment Law Review: "[Horten's} methodology in analysing the policy-making process is thorough, has the benefit of hindsight and is buttressed by freedom of information requests. It tells a tale that needs to be heard. Anyone interested in the future of copyright law in the European Union and the role lobbyists and corporations play in shaping legislation should read this timely and provocative book." 

Electronic Frontier Foundation: "A Copyright Masquerade  can verge on academic, but it remains engaging. At times, the legislative history (and the scandal involved) even has elements of intrigue. But most importantly, it's extremely informative and demystifying, right from the first page's handy table of common acronyms. For those interested in the structures that influence copyright policy around the world, Horten's book will prove a valuable resource."

Media and Arts Law Review Although A Copyright Masqerade is euro-centric in its focus, similar dynamics are evident in other parts of the world, not in the least the current proposals in Australia regarding online copyright infringement and the close relationship the Commonwealth Government seems to enjoy with certain large rights holders. Furthermore, the concept of policy laundering copyright provisions through international trade treaties has made a resurgence with the Trans Pacific Partnership and the Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership agreements currently under negotiation. All of this makes Horten’s study of great relevance to these contemporary processes in both Europe and Australia,

Society for Computers and the Law magazine (SCL law): "Monica Horten has made a wonderful attempt to wash away some of the ignorance surrounding copyright and 'freedoms'. [...] I do recommend it heartily. It should foster further debate – and make it easier for the next major policy debate to be conducted more transparently."

ZDNet: "these cases show a great deal about how modern lobbying works in any field. Today's lobbyists don't settle for rolling up to legislators' offices and making their case. No: they draft entire pieces of legislation. They policy-launder, persuading multiple countries to pass the same provisions [...] None of this is democracy as we would wish it to be carried out. Horten's work is, accordingly, important: it explains why the evidence and the popular vote can all line up, and yet not be reflected in the law that finally passes." "Die britische Wissenschaftlerin Monica Horten, [...] spürt in ihrem vor kurzem erschienen Buch "A Copyright Masquerade" den Machenschaften der Unterhaltungsindustrienach und zeigt auf, wie demokratische Prozesse durch die Taktiken der Industrielobbyisten unterwandert werden."

(Read on for more reviews)

Read more: A Copyright Masquerade: How Corporate Lobbying Threatens Online Freedoms

The Copyright Enforcement Enigma was launched in the European Parliament  on 20 March 2012. I was delighted to have the two Telecoms Package rapporteurs, Catherine Trautmann and Malcolm Harbour both speak at the event. I was also very pleased that the University of Westminster, where I carried out my PhD research on which the book is based, supported the event, and I would  like to thank Christian Engström for hosting it.

 It was an opportunity to reflect on political events regarding Internet policy. A common theme of all the speakers was the emergence of the citizens’ agenda in respect of Internet and communications policy, and the importance of engaging people in the political process.  Catherine Trautmann provided us with some interesting observations on the Telecoms Package and Internet freedoms, which is one of the themes addressed in the book:

Read more: European Parliament launch for Copyright Enforcement Enigma

Don't miss Iptegrity!  RSS/ Bookmark is the website of Dr Monica Horten, European expert on Internet policy and Visiting Fellow at the London School of Economics & Political Science. She is an independent expert on the Council of Europe Committee on Cross-border flow of Internet traffic and Internet freedom (MSI-INT). She was shortlisted for The Guardian Open Internet Poll 2012. Iptegrity  offers expert insights into Internet policy. Iptegrity has a core readership in the Brussels policy community, and has been cited in the media. Please acknowledge Iptegrity when you cite or link.  For more, see IP politics with integrity is made available free of charge for  non-commercial use, Please link-back & attribute Monica Horten. Thank you for respecting this.

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The politics of copyright

A Copyright Masquerade - How corporate lobbying threatens online freedoms

'timely and provocative' Entertainment Law Review

Paperback and Kindle and Epub formats.

Available from all good online bookstores or get it from the publisher Zed Books  direct:

Amazon UK

Amazon USA